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07776771781

Addy

Adam

Dimensions: 40x50cm
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Description: A depiction of events happening around the world, brought about by deforestation and anthropogenic activities that contribute to climate change and spieces extinction. The hour glass scene illustrates time running out, with the upper chamber depicting the rapidly melting ice of the arctic dripping into the sands of the Sahara desert. The broken glass symbolises the widening hole of the ozone layer, caused by fossil fuel emissions and forest fires illustrated in the background.

07487742816

Aindreas

Scholz

'A sip of earth - that's like a big, bitter one. Have you ever had earth in your mouth?'

(Heinrich Böll, A Mouthful of Earth, 1962)

As an island nation, water has shaped and reshaped much of Ireland’s prosperity. However, water also threatens. According to several scientific papers, Ireland’s coastline, will experience dramatic sea level rises by 2050. Unmitigated, one article predicts that ‘[s]ea level is projected to continue to rise … All major cities in Ireland are in coastal locations subject to tides, any significant rise in sea levels will have major economic, social, and environmental impacts. Rising sea levels around Ireland would result in increased coastal erosion, flooding and damage to property and infrastructure.’

The German Nobel Prize Laureate, Heinrich Böll, had a lifelong interest in environmental conservation, as evidenced in his play Ein Schluck Erde (German: A Mouthful of Earth) written in 1962. The play, set in the future, portrays a dystopian society surviving above a flooded earth by scavenging the oceans and processing vestiges of remaining soil. Poignantly, Böll’s subject matter highly resonates with the emerging environmental issues as already evidenced in the first quarter of the 21st century.

This emerging climate crisis is strongly echoed in my work because my methodology relies on the use of seawater and soil to evoke place-specific coastal and environmental vulnerability and highlights the urgent need to develop alternatives to reduce our global carbon footprint.

Looking at Böll’s polysemic concept of Erde (German: earth, Earth, or soil), We Are Making A New World incorporates ‘soil’ as part of my sustainable photographic printing practice, simultaneously evoking the gradual threat that coastal erosions pose, particularly, for coastal communities.

07866769949

Alice

Watkins

'Dunwich Church on the cliff edge (in 1904)', graphite and gouache on clay, 14x10cm, 2021

The work depicts Dunwich Church in 1904 before it fell into the sea due to coastal erosion. The small Suffolk town is now completely lost to the North Sea. This stark reminder of the impact a body of water can have on human structures, and the ease with which nature can destroy communities, speaks to the destruction we are seeing currently due to the impact of climate change. Coastal erosion in the UK will be accelerated due to more extreme weather and ocean level rises.

My upbringing in Worcestershire meant I spent a lot of time in the Wyre Forest, which is where the hardened, raw clay surface of this drawing has been dug up from. The use of local clay as a surface for drawing stems from my interest in the relationships between humans, non-humans, and the landscapes and ecologies we both inhabit.

01905641943

Alison

Griffin

Coloured pencil drawing on paper. Landscape. 60cm x 42cm currently unframed

It is anticipated that within the next 40 years Polar Bears wii be extinct due to global warming resulting from our lifestyles. This makes me feel desperately sad and guilty. Polar Bears regularly appear on merchandise as cute cuddly creatures. The production of these items will have contributed to global warming and their demise.

I chose coloured pencils as a medium because of their delicacy suggesting fragility. The image is simple and stark.

07808 726548

Andrew

Howe

Painting of a Sphagnum Moss using peat on handmade paper made with recycled paper and bracken collected from the Marches Mosses peat bog on the border between Shropshire and Wales. Dimensions: 48cm x 71cm, unframed, to be wall mounted using clips.

Peat is 90% water and plays a vital role in protecting against flooding and loss of water quality; peat’s ability to store carbon helps mitigate against climate change. Peatlands are only 8% of UK land area and yet hold vast amounts of carbon, around 36 times more than is stored by all of the UK’s woodlands.

Sphagnum moss is the primary component in peat formation, and it creates the low nutrient, acidic conditions that makes the specialised biodiverse peat bog ecosystem. It is the living and dead plants that hold large quantities of water inside their cells; plants may hold 16 to 26 times as much water as their dry weight, depending on the species.

The deep red coloured Sphagnum Magellanicum is one of the main peat forming species, rare in the UK but found at the Marches Mosses.

The processes of working intimately with materials from the landscape in this artwork offer a way to develop a harmonised relationship with the more-than-human realm in the wetlands and other fragile environments.

07870833742

Andrew

Woodhead

'We Control The Weather' is from an ongoing series of drawings called 'View From A High Speed Train' that depict imaginary journeys around England referencing politics, the economy, inequality and the environment. 'We Control The Weather' considers our tendency to exploit nature without fully understanding or acknowledging the consequences of our actions resulting in climate change. The drawings are built up in layers using marker pens, paint pens and stamp printed text to evoke a sense of movement, fluidity, bad weather and growing environmental chaos.

Dimensions: 30cm x 21cm (framed)

07718944189

Angela

Maloney

Lithographic ink, pastel and charcoal on paper, 2021 25 x 35 cms

The Deluge is the last in a series of work loosely based on the Victorian dome jars which encapsulated ‘collectibles’ such as taxidermy birds and rare butterflies. This imagery is used in a pictorial and metaphorical way, commenting on humankind’s covetousness, and its track record of taking from the fragile natural world at any cost. Inspired by the biblical engraving of the same title, by the Romantic artist Gustave Dore, this image hints at futility; the inescapable evidence of the damage caused by the rapacity with which we have pillaged all we can from the exhausted world around us and the overwhelming consequences we now face as a result of climate change.

01242621296

Angela

Summerfield

I am a rurally-based professional painter, who lives on the North Gloucestershire/Worcestershire borders. This painting is part of a series which responds to our sense of place and the role lived experiences and memory plays in this. The format, 38x 38cm (framed) invites comparison with Dutch 17th-century paintings and the use of the square format. The church spire motif is also a deliberate reference to the archetypal images of the countryside, which have come to be associated with the art of John Constable. The flooding of our fields and meadows results in change to soil structures and herbage fertility. This green palimpsest is expressed by the fragmentations of greens, in the middle and foreground. Fragmentation and softness, or blurring of imagery, are also expressive of memory recall processing. ‘The Landscape of Memory (2),’ can therefore be thought of as a landscape of the mind.

07949717895

Ann

Rodger

28 x 33 cm
Collagraph print.
Futuristic watery, marshy scene of fruit trees growing. Not Worcester pears or Pershore plums but oranges!

07968678225

Anna

Walsh

A White Swan Event on the Severn
Cyanotype print on paper 30 x 30cm (framed)
edition of 10

A Black Swan Event is described as an event that ‘comes as a surprise, has a major effect, and is often inappropriately rationalised after the fact with the benefit of hindsight’ where as a White Swan Event is ‘a highly certain event, whose impact is easily estimated and after the event shifts the focus to errors in judgement or some other human form of causation’.

Climate change has been described as a White Swan Event in some circles - we have been predicting it for ages. It is exactly what we expect to experience.

This cyanotype print comprises two photos I have taken while visiting Worcester. Once when I went down to the river to walk my dog, and realised there wasn’t a path anymore as the river had flooded, and all I could see was the sign that was usually on the footpath sticking out in the middle of the water. The other is of a swan floating on the river. I have composed them together so the swan is happily floating by as the river floods. Flooding of the river in Worcester is fairly common, but this was the first time I had personally witnessed it in such a direct manner, and as it becomes more common in the rest of the country, the impact and frequency of flooding becomes more and more alarming.

Swans are a common, and symbolic, sight in Worcester and it even has a swan sanctuary on the river, and on several occasions they have been photographed taking over the city when there has been extreme flooding.

Cyanotypes are made using water to develop them, so this adds to the watery element of the piece.

07941177575

Anna

Briggs

Before moving to Malvern I lived just outside Worcester for a good few years and just about every winter there was a threat of our lane and home being flooded; for us it finally happened in 2014. I guess my idea of flooding had always been a rush of water into the lane and house – a quick, violent assault. But it wasn’t like that – it took days. Bit by bit the water crept forever nearer to our home and we were powerless. In the end it seeped up under the house and up through the floor; a slow and gentle attack, but devastating nonetheless. A feeling of violation – our place of safety was not safe anymore.

Every time the Severn flood water subsided, such was the tide mark of detritus we would collect bags and bags of rubbish. It was on one occasion I found a small mound of organic matter, mixed with plastic sacking, a mask and nearby lay a splintered pane of glass which had remained remarkably intact. A shattered and broken Worcester and world. I felt angry and ashamed as I was, and am part of this world we’re destroying through climate change. I wanted to record through my art photography how I felt - hence my photograph ‘Broken Serenity’.

07907847459

Anne

Brierley

Screen print with relief print on Fabrianopaper - A2 edition of 50

07976819440

Beverley

Ismail

‘MIRACLE ON THE NILE’ painting 50X90CM (framed 95x65cm) Egypt has been at the forefront of climate change this year hosting COP27, not for the first time. A marvellous example of the effects of climate and resolution is at Abu Simbel temple, Upper Egypt. A salvage operation that inspired the world. Dating back to 1954, flooding was a major problem. A dam was built in order to reserve overflowing river water later know as Lake Nasser. This flooded the Nile valley and consequently caused a major problem with communities settled in the region along with historical civilisations. 1959 A huge salvation operation taking 20 years to complete carrying out emergency salvage excavations and relocating structures above high-waterlines. This was the worlds first and biggest long term international heritage preservation effort at Abu-Simbel. Relocating the temple from flooding pushed boundaries in technology at the time and physically challenging-dismantling the temples by cutting into massive blocks to reassemble to a safer designated area. Engineers moved the temple to above dam and rising water levels. Abu-Simbel brilliantly demonstrated what countries sharing common values were capable of achieving through co-operation. Abu-Simbel is an example of pursuing both economic development and preserving cultural heritage. Lessons must be learned that action for change and development is not impossible and can be achieved if we are committed and determined to prevent further climate change disasters. I have travelled for 30 years to Egypt, I have a passion for its culture and history. This painting portrays the emotionally strong bond and connection I hold with this country. I thought deeply about which medium best suited this painting, coffee was predominantly used with graphite and watercolour for the Nile and palm creating a calming aged feeling, while leaving a free edge effect to enhance the overall painting.

+447905954385

Biddy

Williams

The overwhelming heat of the latest summer changed the colours of evening sunset
The garden looked hot

+447905954385

Biddy

Williams

I have expressed the chaos fear and destruction caused by climate change. 1 of 2

+447905954385

Biddy

Williams

My concerns on rising sea levels depicting unusual movement in sea bed

+447905954385

Biddy

Williams

I have tried to express the chaos fear and destruction of heat and floods
1 of 2

+447905954385

Biddy

Williams

This found piece is from a tree blown down in my woods at the start of22 . The top is a root ,uprooted by wet earth and strong winds . The piece is slightly rendered symbolising the mess and destruction

+447905954385

Biddy

Williams

Abstract mixed media

+447905954385

Biddy

WILLIAMS

Climate causes chaos
I have created a piece of abstract expression drowning to relate to the chaos and horror of water mass
Illustrating darkness and

07496151589

Caitlin

Carpenter

Height: 21cm
Length: 37cm

Farming has always been apart of my life ever since I was born. I can remember the weather has played a massive part in the success or fail of the session for the farmer . During the time it floods I can remember walking down to the fields and watching a gate being ripped from the ground by the strong currents of water and thinking “ wasn’t it good we moved the sheep the other day” but that’s not the case with all farms they can’t simply move the livestock away from danger they have to deal with the devastation that the floods leave behind. Farmers do there best to jump into the water and save the animals they can but more often than not theres going to massive casualties. This doesn’t exclude the damage done to the land which takes month to heal leaving the ground unable to grew food needed to feed people and animals.
I wanted to create this painting to bring awareness to the catastrophe floods cause to farmers who are already struggling and the inevitable damage it will bring again.

07976757150

Cameron

Scott

I come from a small village in Aberdeenshire next to the river Don which flooded regularly coming close to the centre of the village. I then taught at Shrewsbury School of Art, which was situated next to the Severn, and during my 10 years there it flooded quite a number of times, and we had a grandstand view from the art school. Then when we were buying a house in Frome which we were looking forward to moving to with its artistic reputation, the survey came back that the property had been subjected to flooding three times. So, this collage is about the flood in Frome and the small dark figure of a boy watching the flooded river is actually myself at the age I was when I used to watch the river Don flood in my home village. At that age it was exciting at my more advanced age it is a worry for the world.

33ins X 23ins

07792008752

Carrie

Sermon

I suffer bouts of low mental health especially anxiety and heard wild swimming helps with this so I started swimming in the Avon close to Tewkesbury. Sadly river pollution is impacting on water quality including on local flora and fauna and also preventing myself from swimming in nature. I made three rivermaids to represent my local rivers of the Severn, Avon and Wye which reflects them living in polluted river water and their connection to river environments. I made the rivermaids from upcycled materials and found objects. 50cms long x19cms x 7cms

07900493867

Chris M.

Allton

Size 615mm x 615mm
The work is a Montage (of images I've created) to tell a future story,
The image is then transferred onto a large inter-neg and hand printed onto Agar Agar gelatine substitute and light sensitive chemistry layered onto glass (recycled from old greenhouse glass from the local area)
It is then dyed several time over a course of a few days with household detergent and tannic acid from coffee grounds. And mounted onto recycled 100%rag paper.
I like to think of the image as a warning of a future where water is one of the major concerns for everyday life.
I could be argued that the older generations have bought everything and left nothing in the shop for the infant generation. I have tried to hint at this and other absurdities we encounter every day.
Hottest summer,
Driest summer,
Wettest summer,
Coldest summer,
The floods surrounding us,

07729315614

Claire

Hilton

Mixed media assemblage mini tin art. 6 x 4 x 1 inches. We rely on water, we need it to live, we are made of it – but how much it too much? When does what we need to live, become a threat to life?

"Finishing isn't the point" is a mixed media collage assemblage piece that challenges the viewer to think outside their own lifetime. The piece uses re-cycled and re-purposed items such as a food tin, roof pins, and recycled paper and words from book pages. The colours and layers evoke water-based themes with dead/cooked fishes in the centre. Contrasting wildlife with man-made. What we want with what we discard. Easy to ignore but striking once seen. Raw and uncomfortable. Pricking at our conscience. Asking us to reassess. Do we hold the key? or is it all together bigger than us. Are we racing towards an inevitable finishing line without thinking about our consequences on others.

07941690592

Claire

Tindall

Hafren Rising - is my re-imagining of the legend of the goddess of the River Severn in the context of our present experience of climate change and environmental damage. Hafren (also known as Sabrina), goddess and guardian of the river, has bourn witness to the damage of her under water world and the creatures within it. With great power she rises, a message of warning and call for action in face of a disaster that is in our power to change.

Mixed media and found materials
W = 27cm, H = 27cm, D = 15cm

07941690592

Claire

Tindall

Hafren Rising - is my re-imagining of the legend of the goddess of the River Severn in the context of our present experience of climate change and environmental damage. Hafren (also known as Sabrina), goddess and guardian of the river, has bourn witness to the damage of her under water world and the creatures within it. With great power she rises, a message of warning and call for action in face of a disaster that is in our power to change.

Dimensions -W = 27cm, H = 27cm, D = 15cm
Mixed media, found materials

07804656916

Clare

Wratten

This is a painting on canvas in acrylics and mixed media. (Dimensions: 1m x 1m + a little for frame.)

Global warming is accelerating the physical marking of land surfaces by processes of excessive accumulation of water and subsequent parching of places where water has flowed and stood. Increasingly there appears new terrain which, as a result, is subject to scouring and deposition of minerals to form dramatic patterns indicative of the natural forces applied at all scales from the regional to the microscopic.

The effect may be ambiguous - climate is described as 'changed' as opposed to 'damaged'. The aesthetics of changed topography can be fascinating and pleasing even when the change signifies great risk in the context of life, not least that of humans.

My paintings are frequently inspired by aerial photographs, landscape and fascinating textures and colours. I enjoy the physical qualities of media and materials as much as their visual effect.

I deeply enjoy exploring the relationship between myself, the media I use, and the qualities that can be discovered beyond those I immediately control. There is natural randomness, an element of creative chaos and the joy of the unpredictable when working with textured materials in combination with paint.

07813342916

Clare

Knighton

As a neurodiverse painter I often use my senses to paint and reflect my emotions. This acrylic painting through my use of colour shows the vast range of weather available but reflects the uncertainty that climate change brings. The under colour of black suggests a dark future but this is superseded by vibrant colour which shows us there is always hope.

07804656916

Clare

Wratten

This is a painting on canvas in acrylics and mixed media. (Dimensions: 1m x 1m + a little for frame.)

Global warming is accelerating the physical marking of land surfaces by processes of excessive accumulation of water and subsequent parching of places where water has flowed and stood. Increasingly there appears new terrain which, as a result, is subject to scouring and deposition of minerals to form dramatic patterns indicative of the natural forces applied at all scales from the regional to the microscopic.

The effect may be ambiguous - climate is described as 'changed' as opposed to 'damaged'. The aesthetics of changed topography can be fascinating and pleasing even when the change signifies great risk in the context of life, not least that of humans.

My paintings are frequently inspired by aerial photographs, landscape and fascinating textures and colours. I enjoy the physical qualities of media and materials as much as their visual effect.

I deeply enjoy exploring the relationship between myself, the media I use, and the qualities that can be discovered beyond those I immediately control. There is natural randomness, an element of creative chaos and the joy of the unpredictable when working with textured materials in combination with paint.

07804656916

Clare

Wratten

This is a painting on canvas in acrylics and mixed media. (Dimensions: 1m x 1m + a little for frame.)

Global warming is accelerating the physical marking of land surfaces by processes of excessive accumulation of water and subsequent parching of places where water has flowed and stood. Increasingly there appears new terrain which, as a result, is subject to scouring and deposition of minerals to form dramatic patterns indicative of the natural forces applied at all scales from the regional to the microscopic.

The effect may be ambiguous - climate is described as 'changed' as opposed to 'damaged'. The aesthetics of changed topography can be fascinating and pleasing even when the change signifies great risk in the context of life, not least that of humans.

My paintings are frequently inspired by aerial photographs, landscape and fascinating textures and colours. I enjoy the physical qualities of media and materials as much as their visual effect.

I deeply enjoy exploring the relationship between myself, the media I use, and the qualities that can be discovered beyond those I immediately control. There is natural randomness, an element of creative chaos and the joy of the unpredictable when working with textured materials in combination with paint.

+44 7874361902

Claudia

Tong

What happens when two domestic ginger cats meet their Amazonian cousin on a TV screen? Which Amazon do we know better, amazon.com or the largest tropical rainforest on earth? We humans live in an urban jungle of bricks, concrete and consumerism, our cats live a carefree life in the living room, while the Northern Tiger Cats are losing their natural habitat in the rainforest primarily due to climate change. Using art as a medium, I want to advocate for attention: climate change is upon us. Let’s care about the nature as much as our own home.

07802932564

Conrad

Judge

Work produced by sublimation print onto 4 aluminium sheets. Individual panels feature 2 details from photographs of flood water from 2020 floods in Herefordshire, one detail from a photograph of flames, and a scan of an intermediate phase of an earlier work of mine, which featured an image of icebergs, made through a procion dye screen print onto velour fabric. Printed across all 4 panels is the frontispiece of Galileo’s book, “A Dialogue Between The Two Great World Systems”, in which he argued for the scientific Copernican view against the prevailing views held by the church and the Pope, which I felt had parallels with the climate scientists and those who doubt that climate chang3 is caused by man. 40cm by 30 cm.

07761604884

Dan

Holden

For this work I transcribed some of the speeches made at the COP27 climate change conference. The speeches I chose were from the worlds smaller nations (such as the Pacific island nations whose entire existence is threatened by rising sea levels as well as those affected by desertification). These nations contribute little to impacting the changes in global temperature whilst being the most affected.

07514492711

Elaina

Arkeooll

These are upcycled, re-purposed, bricolage, defaced, refaced, expensive pharmaceutical products, a year's supply , month by month, daily use, holding back the impacts of pollution, enablers of breath.
Sitting , gazing at the first one, I noticed I was looking at an object that reminded me of a man, who in 2019, was President of the USA, domineering and dominant in decisions that have impacted climate globally.
I live at sea level, I live in house where there has been flooding, I've cleared the rank water, bucketful by bucketful as the children ran through the rank water- we were desperate and eh floods returned sudden and terrible last summer- 'an Act of God' the water company said but the only bearded old men in the sky were those who had flown from earth to try out their rockets, whilst climate change is wreaking havoc right here in the lives of more and more people.
We already know what Mass Extinctions mean, we as people on the planet already know that fossil fuel use is driving changed climate and bringing fire and flood, that kills people and other species and leaves survivors scarred and scared.

07403448050

Ella

Buchanan

Possibly our generation's greatest advocate for the natural world and its protection and preservation, David Attenborough has become a leading voice on climate change. Setting a stark vision for the future with his 2020 film, A Life on Our Planet, he highlights how the Arctic, one of the coldest and most remote places on Earth, has experienced summer sea ice reducing by 40% in 40 years. 
This mixed media piece combines thin washes with blocks of colour and line work to represent the melting ice caps and rising water levels. Despite the bleak facts, there is yet a flicker of hope for the planet, represented by the touches of colour in David's face.
"We can yet make amends, change direction and once again become a species in harmony with nature. All we require is the will." - David Attenborough.
Photo reference with kind written permission from photographer Sam Faulkner.
Mixed media on canvas, 24 in x 24in

07793366084

Emma

Yorke

Gallitrops in Blind Yeo Stream, 2021
Cyanotype on 3 fabric panels with stitched found plastic thread.
Mounted and framed (45x125cm)
(Shown unframed in attached image)

Organic forms appeared as the cyanotype coated fabric was floated on the surface of the water at the mouth of the Yeo at Cleevedon. Stitched found plastic thread rings are colour coded to show decreasing water quality over a period of 5 years (data from The Environment Agency). As a wild swimmer, I am particularly concerned about increases in water pollution in our rivers and estuaries, as these areas are becoming increasingly vulnerable due to rising sea levels and increased surface water run off and flooding, caused by climate change.

'Gallitrops' forms part of a body of work that draws on scientific data, memory, embodied experiences and the writings of others. Working with photography, collecting, text, stitch and repurposed materials, each piece intertwines multiple stories learned through head, heart and hand.

I am an artist based in Cheltenham who works site-specifically, most often in collaboration with place. I am currently studying the MA Arts & Place at Dartington School of Arts.

07968 771582

Felicity

Robinson

This organic abstract painting “Currents and Connections - Ice Eddies” looks, with hope, though melting ice to the sky above.
There are hidden depths and darkness but also life and light. Some asemic writing crosses the piece, as a message to the future.
My work aims to give a glimpse into the endlessly fascinating details moods and atmospheres that are in the natural world. A world that is threatened by climate change and specifically flooding from rising sea levels and storms.
Currents and Connections is a series of work that expresses my feelings about human connections with our planet. “Ice Eddies” is one of this series. The painting evokes my concern about climate change, it’s impact on ice caps, rising sea levels, floods and extreme weather events.
The natural world is endlessly fascinating, in all its intricacies, so in my work I focus on visual texture and the restorative impact of nature, but also I aim to give people pause to think about what we are losing. There is a powerful thread of biophilia through my art inspired by my feelings of connection with the natural world around us and the threats to it posed by climate change. Biophilia is defined as the innate human instinct to connect with nature and other living beings. We are one world, one biome and need to ‘tread lightly’.
Through my art I hope people will think more deeply about this vital connection and our collective responsibility for the planet.31cm x 31cm Mixed media on cradled birch ply - framed

07968 771582

Felicity

Robinson

This painting “Currents and Connections - Ice Eddies” looks, with hope, though melting ice to the sky above.
There are hidden depths and darkness but also life and light. Some asemic writing crosses the piece, as a message to the future.
My work aims to give a glimpse into the endlessly fascinating details moods and atmospheres that are in the natural world. A world that is threatened by climate change and specifically flooding from rising sea levels and storms.
Currents and Connections is a series of work that expresses my feelings about human connections with our planet. “Ice Eddies” is one of this series. The painting evokes my concern about climate change, it’s impact on ice caps, rising sea levels, floods and extreme weather events.
The natural world is endlessly fascinating, in all its intricacies, so in my work I focus on visual texture and the restorative impact of nature, but also I aim to give people pause to think about what we are losing. There is a powerful thread of biophilia through my art inspired by my feelings of connection with the natural world around us and the threats to it posed by climate change. Biophilia is defined as the innate human instinct to connect with nature and other living beings. We are one world, one biome and need to ‘tread lightly’.
Through my art I hope people will think more deeply about this vital connection and our collective responsibility for the planet.
31cm x 31cm Mixed media on cradled birch ply - framed £249

07999 815117

Felix

Wilkinson

I am interested in how the landscape is transformed when it is flooded. A familiar place can appear completely different. I am alarmed by the increase in flood severity and its implications for the global crisis.
This painting, in oil on canvas, is based on a photo taken in 2021 when there was bad flooding in the area in which i live, cutting off the main road out of the village. It made it very apparent how dependent we all are on accessibility for goods and services, not to mention social contact.
I have tried to portray the beauty of the landscape under water as well as a sense of emptiness.

07758002942

Frans

Wesselman

This etching relates to an earlier climate emergency and depicts a moment of hope. It is the one emotion that keeps us battling on in spite of all the problems facing us, however overwhelming they appear. The image size is 18x21 cm., framed size 36.5x37.5 cm.

07964298806

Helen

Cass

Mapping of space and marking of time are both important in this series of drawings. I live on the same land that was worked by four different generations. Measuring and recording water levels seems to be a quiet but essential activity at this time. An ink line is drawn along the uppermost edge of the paper that has been flooded by ink, traced from left to right horizontally across the page. This action is then repeated, each time trying to draw a steady, straight line across the surface. A fine mapping nib is dipped into the ink bottle and the line drawn as close to the line before as possible. A quasi-mechanical activity which is doomed to imperfection, but creates a field of frisson/noise/interference that is specifically autobiographic. Therefore the most systematic procedure is not merely pure process – it is actually producing a drawing that is intimately expressive.

07964298806

Helen

Cass

Mapping of space and marking of time are both important in this series of drawings. I live on the same land that was worked by four different generations. Measuring and recording water levels seems to be a quiet but essential activity at this time. An ink line is drawn along the uppermost edge of the paper that has been flooded by ink, traced from left to right horizontally across the page. This action is then repeated, each time trying to draw a steady, straight line across the surface. A fine mapping nib is dipped into the ink bottle and the line drawn as close to the line before as possible. A quasi-mechanical activity which is doomed to imperfection, but creates a field of frisson/noise/interference that is specifically autobiographic. Therefore the most systematic procedure is not merely pure process – it is actually producing a drawing that is intimately expressive.

07964298806

Helen

Cass

Mapping of space and marking of time are both important in this series of drawings. I live on the same land that was worked by four different generations. Measuring water levels and plotting these on charts seems to be a quiet but essential requirement of our time.
An ink line is drawn along the uppermost edge of the paper, traced from left to right horizontally across the page. This action is then repeated, each time trying to draw a steady, straight line across the surface. A fine mapping nib is dipped into the ink bottle and the line drawn as close to the line before as possible. A quasi-mechanical activity which is doomed to imperfection, but creates a field of frisson/noise/interference that is specifically autobiographic.

07599419399

Hollie

Taylor

height:30cm
Green Onyx vase and a single dried, pressed white rose.

These found objects are man made. I cut the flower from the earth. I didn't water it. I didn't give it hope. I crushed it and left it to die to create something aesthetically pleasing for my home.

The vase, an Onyx gemstone carved into a man made shape by machines. Both objects were destroyed to create something that helps us but doesn't give anything back.

The world needs hope, patience and people to make a change. But when will it start?

'Green Onyx promotes growth and patience and is known to have healing properties'
Quote from https://www.venuj.co.uk/blogs/blog/green-onyx-meaning-and-who-should-wear-it

'White roses symbolize loyalty, purity, and innocence'
quote from Brides Magazine. - https://www.brides.com/rose-color-meanings-5223107

07817 028684

Ian

Pennell

A film, "No Fly Zone, London Venice" recording a return rail journey between London and Venice on the occasion of visiting the Biennale. It is intended to demonstrate a sustainable form of long distance travel as an alternative to flying.
The file plays twice, each play accompanied by different music tracks, approx 20 minutes run time over 2 plays.
Intellectual property rights: (commercial music tracks) Max Richter and Jasmine Myra; permission received for inclusion in the film. Danish String Quartet; no reply to request for permission. Maya Hawke: no ready contact information available by online searching, so permission not requested.
The mp4 file will be sent separately via a One Drive sharing link. The submitted file is a screenshot.

07432843199

Isabella

Draper

I am submitting 3 segments of 1 painting (the original painting consists of 14 segments) to be displayed as a triptych. The 'Rain Painting' segments are mounted and framed. The work is a comment on climate changes impact of increased rainfall and flooding. Flooding is something my home areas is subject to as I live next to the River Severn, and has increased in frequency over the years. During an evening in November 2022, the rain was beating down on my studio. I took the opportunity to use the rain as my tool, to create a large abstract painting. Paint was substituted with coffee, which bled over the paper to form an ariel landscape, leaving gritty residue and pools reminiscent of flood water. Once dry, the painting was parted into 14 segments, creating multiple ariel landscapes that talk to each other.

Dimensions of the 3 segments:
x2 (12cmx12cm) mounted and framed, x1 (20cmx20cm) mounted and framed.

The segments can be sold together or separately:
All together = £160
20cmx20cm = £70
12cmx12cm = £45

07947662490

Issie

Martin

'Seepage' is an A1 (59.4 x 84.1 cm) cyanotype print of rock erosion on tissue paper. This piece explores the ephemerality of coastal and river landscapes due to the impact of the erosive processes occurring in these environments. Through engaging with and developing a visual representation of climate concerns, I focus upon the permeability of our habitats and view erosive marks as temporary, material, historical records of a changing landscape.

Within my practice, I use light-sensitive cyanotype and natural inks to create ‘drip drawings’ and photographic prints. I often delegate creative agency to the element of water to control the final outcomes, spraying, dripping and even flooding my paper-based works. By harnessing the natural water cycle I attempt to sustain a cyclical artistic practice - using both the sun’s UV and heat to develop and evaporate the excess water from the prints.

Flooding has impacted both my home on the tidal River Stour, Kent as well as my grandparents’ home in Kempsey, Worcester. This innate connection to flooding has inspired the majority of my artistic practice and has brought the uncontrollable fate of our homes to the forefront. I attempt to create connections between an individualised community who collectively experience the fragility of the physical world in the face of climate change.

The delicacy of 'Seepage’s tissue paper base aims to provoke reflection of humanity’s marks made upon the earth - emphasising the need for long-lasting ecological investment.

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JIM

O'RAW

BRITISH PETROLEUM (OPEN) BROLLY - 95cm x 123cm

CHILDRENS SHELL SHAPED SAND PIT WITH SANDBAGS - 100cm x 100cm

WORCESTER FOODBANK DONATIONS - (assortment of goods)

07377836567

JIM

O'RAW

BRITISH PETROLEUM GOLF BROLLY (OPENED) - 95cm x 123cm

KID'S SHELL SAND PIT WITH SANDBAGS - 100cm x 100cm

WORCESTER FOODBANK DONATION (ASSORTMENT OF PRODUCTS)

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Jain

McKay

Digital Print on paper
Damaged by rain in 2022
45 x 31 cms

07523 192721

Jamie

Banks

ROD & RUBBLE ROD H X 62” W X 1.9” D X 1”
RUBBLE - INTERCHANGEABLE
Reclaimed Wood, Reclaimed Emulsion Paint & Left Over Plaster

This particular piece of work along with others within this series, focus on the utilisation of waste or surplus materials from my own or others artistic practice. I do this as I believe it is an artists job to promote sustainable practices and try to reduce the materials we waste or figure out ways in which our waste can inform our practice further.

The reason I like to use materials like wood and plaster are that they will eventually rot or decay and cease to exist as objects within the world. I believe due to the technological advances, we no longer need our work to outlive us like the artist throughout history. Challenging history and former practice of sculpture and it’s specifically it’s permanence is the only way we as artists can move forward and question the ethics and geo-political position of art-making today.

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Jancis

Vaughan

My piece is about the melting of the Arctic ice sheet, due mainly to humankind's excessive use of fossil fuels. It hangs from three wires, and is made of (now obsolete) incandescent lightbulbs and reconstituted plastic sheeting, which in its turn is made of recycled bottles and CDs. The lightbulbs form the shape of an iceberg, and the plastic sheet is in the shape of the minimum extent of the summer sea ice as shown in the Times Concise Atlas of the World (1996 reprint). People usually ask if it lights up - it doesn't; climate change presents us with a future where more than lightbulbs will have become obsolete.
Measurements are approx W.7m, L1.3m, H.8m (excluding wires).

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Jane

Walker

This is a painting of a river in the local park that is very full of water, due to the high rain fall. The river is on a flood plain and sometimes flows over the whole flood plain. I was trying to paint the sense of the water rising.

watercolour on paper 56x76cm framed will be 60x80cm

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Jeanette

Kinsey

The work is a charcoal drawing based on a picture taken the morning after a night of rain in February 2020, which saw my neighbours' house flooded and caused them to have to relocate. The drawing depicts a waterlogged field with the morning sun just showing above the tree branches. There is hope and there will be a 'Morning after Rain', if we react and act on the climate change issues that face us.
Dimensions: A3
If accepted it will be framed with mount so slightly larger, more like 500x400mm

07828112736

Jeff

Orgee

Title: ‘Burn-off in the Vale’

Mixed media on canvas.

Annual burn off of stubble in the Vale of Evesham next to a very water logged field. Do we make the connection? Mans impact responsible for increasing extreme weather events, wetter winters and resulting flooding.

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Jennifer

Ng

Seasonal flood occurs as a part of the ecological processes, bringing with it freshwater and rich nutrients to the biodiversity. Nutrients from organic material left behind on floodplain penetrates layers of soil and contributes to the improvement of plant growth. However, in recent years, climate change is altering the way floods impact on our ecosystems. While seasonal floods to drive the ecological processes, terrestrial plants and some delicate species may be prone to the excessive moisture in the soil which could potentially destroy them.

Using water-based mediums, I explore the indexical imprints of germination, growth, decay, and regeneration in ‘Journal of Time’. White space is presented here as the metaphor of a liminal space where human interventions and nature’s expandability play out. It is a space where possibilities can still manifest and thrive.

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Jennifer

Viner

My submission for this exhibition is a response specifically to the reoccurring issue of flooding in Worcester, and it's potential future for the city. I have decided to create a piece that links a personal relationship between me and the theme by completing a self portrait, which is a consistent aspect of my practice.

Initial ideas for this began from experiencing the flooding within Worcester last year for the first time. The sights of seeing swans on the pavement where people are usually walking, and the submerged hill leading up to the university campus. It stuck with me, dreading to see it happen again in the near future. My piece serves as a reality check for the viewer, presenting what may seem as an surreal scenario at first glace, yet upon reflection is in fact the reality that the City Of Worcester faces. I also wanted to touch on the perspective of being an artist, my first thought during the flooding last year when I saw the swans on the pavement initially was to want to study them through drawing, therefore I saw this as an opportunity to play on this idea within my submission. The figure of myself sits on a bench observing the swan through life drawing, oblivious to the submerged bench she sits upon. This visualisation of disregard was one I focused on portraying, to address the dangerous ignorance of climate change that is still occurring.

The choice of a graphite pencil drawing was to convey a moment frozen in time. A moment that captures a simple gesture, surrounded by a world of chaos. I wanted a soft, intimate aesthetic which was achievable using blended graphite and erasers. The figure, swan and the bench could potentially read as a statue, due to the monochromatic scheme too. The choice of painting water on top of the glass on the frame was to create an illusion of it standing out to the viewer, having the pencil drawing behind this frame highlighted the flood yet kept it separate from the portrayal of everyday life.

+447746648801

Jennifer

Ng

Seasonal flood occurs as a part of the ecological processes, bringing with it freshwater and rich nutrients to the biodiversity. Nutrients from organic material left behind on floodplain penetrates layers of soil and contributes to the improvement of plant growth. However, in recent years, climate change is altering the way floods impact on our ecosystems. While seasonal floods to drive the ecological processes, terrestrial plants and some delicate species may be prone to the excessive moisture in the soil which could potentially destroy them.

Using water-based mediums, I explore the indexical imprints of germination, growth, decay, and regeneration in ‘Journal of Time’. White space is presented here as the metaphor of a liminal space where human interventions and nature’s expandability play out. It is a space where possibilities can still manifest and thrive.

07766332048

Jenny

Pope

This piece is called 'Objects for Uncertain Times' they are part of a series of sculptural objects looking at anxiety and change and dealing with uncertainty. They represent worry beads or talismans to take us into the future.
I create collections of tools, or ‘worry beads’ using old, found objects exploring psychological change, combining different components to layer the past functions and specific applications to capture the intangible way in which we make decisions, inform changes and how our minds deal with uncertainty.
I have a fascination with the inescapable changes that happen in our internal lives and also externally in the natural environment. I use beachcombing and collecting discarded objects as both a meditative activity and practical taxonomy of found relics. I use the analogy of weathering of objects to suggest the uncertainty and changes we all face as human beings.
I am drawn to explore anxiety around climate crisis and how to bring hope into these issues and our perception of survival.

07765563908

Jo

Tunmer

A recent exhibition at Cambridge Artworks highlighted the concerns of two local MA artists (Jo Tunmer and Cathy Faithfull) on the subject of the changing landscape due to climate change with an emphasis on time and how the fractured nature of the planet could be repaired. The clever use of recycled and repurposed materials gave a visual account of the issues facing us. Ticking clocks spoke of the urgency of action but also gave thought to our own human presence, how precious time is and how, when lost, it can never be recovered. Jigsaw pieces intricately woven spoke of fire and flooding and the most powerful work was a table of personal items belonging to the artists salvaged from fire.

There is often an angry voice attached to climate change, in this exhibition however there is no finger pointing or shouting, just thoughtful pieces of contemporary art opening a dialogue with its audience. It gives climate change an image to take away and consider. A visual representation of the issue facing us. Scientific information is often lost in translation and understanding whereas a picture tells a thousand words.

Artwork can include -
6 sculptural pieces using discarded watches on hand build plinths (150 cm high x 45cm wide )
Sculptural globes - the largest approximately 80cm diameter) on 40cm plinths
hanging sculptures of used jigsaw pieces ( height to be determined depending on site)
photographs
table of burnt objects approximately 8cm x 4m
hand pulled prints x 25 (unframed)

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Joanna

Callaghan

Title: Hazed: Diptych.

2 photographs 40x40cm each, 2698 × 2698dpi., Hazed, Each photograph printed separately on fine art paper Fotospeed Signature NST Bright White and mounted separately on paperboard with anterior wooden frames. Hung separately with a 5 cm gap between them so the total dimensions are 40x85 cm.


The diptych shows two beautiful abstract images of the natural landscape created by an out of focus lens.

The piece represents our problematic relationship with the natural world and our apparent inability to pay proper attention and respect to it. This inability has led to environmental exploitation, biodiversity loss and consequent climate change. It also leads to the commodification of the natural world as a beautiful image to share on social media etc: a particular gaze with an evident bias.

With the climate emergency upon us we, as a species, are really trying to focus on the natural world but it is clear that our vision is clouded by other pressing political and cultural issues. “Hazed” reflects this cloudy vision.

The title "Hazed" is a word with meanings suggesting both ‘inability to be clearly seen’ as well as ‘insulted’, both of which are pertinent here.


As both an artist and a land worker, I am someone who has engaged daily with the earth as a labour as well as an artistic practice for the past fifteen years. This has given me a deep connection with the land and a visceral awareness of the changes occurring through climate change.

I work with process, sculpture, collaboration, performance and photography, focusing on my close observation and knowledge of woodland ecology and the natural world.

My website is https://joannacallaghan.co.uk

My art work can also be seen at: www.flickr.com/people/joannacallaghan/

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Joanna

CROW

FLOODS ON PITCHCROFT, WORCESTER

The River Severn is overflowing its banks and flooding the Racecourse in Worcester with increasing frequency.
The light on the water can look so beautiful which I have endeavoured to capture in my painting. The impact on wild life and the environment, including the human distress and cost of flooded homes is becoming more frequent.
Sometimes fish are stranded on Pitchcroft and have to be rescued by human intervention.
Acrylic on board

PAINTING DIMENSIONS:
H 12” (303mm) x W 10” (252mm) unframed
H 21” (530mm ) X W !7” (430 mm ) maximum size including mount and frame

+447811051079

Joanne

Henderson

This painting is part of a series that looks at the practical, psychological and emotional response to flooding within Worcester due to climate change. I live in Barbourne and my house backs directly on to the Pitchcroft / racecourse area in Worcester that regularly floods due to heaving rainfall. Various parts of the house and garden have been affected by this and continues to be a source of ambiguity and unease. This impacts my relationship with my personal space as my home cannot be fully engaged with due to the precarious location and residual effects of flooding. I have explored my relationship with this through a series of mixed media, ink and collage paintings that demonstrate the interaction and negotiation between home and nature through the materials and techniques used. In these works, I aim to explore the futility and chaos associated with climate change and how this relates to our domestic environments.

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Joe

Black Ardy

In both Celtic and Hindu mythology Danu is the name of a river goddess. If global warming continues unabated we will all need to seek her benevolence to protect us from the rising Severn.

Danu is a paper collage (35x51cm) created from old books and magazines, cut by hand using scalpels and scissors, and assembled with spray-mount and glue on card. I have been collecting collage source material for years, I tend to not have inspiration for specific pieces but start with one or two key images and see how the work develops by selecting additional images to build up the scene until it fits into the aesthetic of my work.

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Jonathan

Oakes

Ankle Deep.Mixed media on collage. 29 x 20 cm. The multi photograph collage adds texture; the soft hues are detailed by possible descriptive lines applied by ballpoint pen and coloured pencil.
We are wading through our house again, just like we did last year and the year before. Ankle deep we paddle in the dark, dirty water. The dank ruined smell rises into our nostrils. About ten years ago now there was a once in a lifetime flooding event, when it seemed that everything was under the water. Since then we are now seemingly and seasonally accustomed to the waters menace. The annual threat rises along with the water levels. We can no longer live like this; we can no longer live here. The place seems so idyllic when the brown water does not cover the streets. The debris of branches, rubbish and peoples once belongings, litter the urban beaches and the dry corners of the town.
Insurance claims, climb once again for plaster work, electrical, floorboards, pumping and carpet. The water mocking us as some of the claims have only just come through. Thoughts turn to living in boats, the mind floats back to the times of busy canals. The waterways were kept cleaner then, not so overgrown and congested with silt, run-off was flowed downstream. Land and fields helped to sponge it, now the concrete only blocks. The slower pace of boat life would have to be adapted, because there is nowhere left to park the car. We are having trouble seeing the river’s boundaries when the floods are in full swing. Fields and roads and low lying houses are vanishing from view. Flood barriers shift the problem letting the silted water travel further on. The cause is the thing that needs addressing.

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Jules

Steed

I produce work using vintage sewing pattern catalogues and New Scientist magazines and vintage space and planet books. I’m really interested in alternative worlds and retro-futurism. So I like to create worlds which are identifiable as in the past but have other worldly atmospheres and constructs. Basically, the same but different. I like to free the people from the catalogues and then create a new world for them to visit and inhabit. The use of science magazines, both vintage and present day give me the ability to make my work have the scale and context of different worlds, planets and universes. This piece shows people visiting a new planet with a view to habitation. If we carry on with the destruction of our planet, this might be the only way we can survive.
Piece is hand cut collage and measures 11" x 11"
More work can be seen #retrorifter
Thanks, Jules

07484883583

Juliet

Mootz

A3 Print with gilded ash key, mounted within a 1.5cm black frame, 53cm x 43cm x 2.5cm.

This work explores ph balance and movement of water. A gilded ash key merges with detritus within the yellow litmus flow.
Representing a 'key' as a potential element of solution, this work represents the part woodland and riverbank trees play in maintaining balance of water tables and environmental stability.

Charcoal, hand made from ash trees was included with inks, acrylic, pencil and river water. This image is part one, capturing a point of the work before a subsequent colour change.

River Litmus Severn is an alert, where its hidden colours influence a rivers health. The River Severn at Worcester is where I have witnessed the river change through seasons and for me has been a litmus and awareness of climate change. Watching debris and detritus travel along the flooded river surface, carrying stories from before and higher along the river, I physically began to embed the narratives of lost trees withing the flow of marks. At times the river curves and spills, flooding beyond its course. Carried within the rivers flow a single golden key rides the river, a capsule, a promise, a possibility.

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Karen

Stone

My submission is a painting ‘Lost’ oil on canvas (92cm wide x 71cm high). It depicts a bird searching for its nest amongst a landscape of trees, water and driving rain.
The initial inspiration came from a photograph I saw on a pub wall in Worcestershire showing the ‘Flooded Three Counties Agricultural Societies Showyard at Worcester 1924’. From the black and white photograph I adapted the shapes to form a composition of trees and vast background representing the river in flood at Worcester. There are also references to Pieter Bruegel’s 16th century painting Hunters in the Snow’. The bird flying above the water is a heron (herons are often seen on the river at Worcester) and there is a reference here to the the work of the late Graham Sutherland, a 20th century neo-romantic abstract painter who painted ‘Bird over Sand’ in 1975. At his height Sutherland created works for the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral and was commissioned by parliament to paint a portrait of Winston Churchill, which proved to be highly controversial. However his work has become less popular in recent times.
Therefore ‘Lost’ represents the real, physical loss of surroundings necessary for existence and the metaphysical loss of ambiance created by our sense of place. A loss that is caused by sustained ignorance over time, as with global warming.

7773355817

Karen

Stone

My submission is a painting ‘Lost’ oil on canvas (92cm wide x 71cm high). It depicts a bird searching for its nest amongst a landscape of trees, water and driving rain.
The initial inspiration came from a black and white photograph I saw on a pub wall in Worcestershire showing the ‘Flooded Three Counties Agricultural Societies Showyard at Worcester 1924’. There are also references to Pieter Bruegel’s 16th century painting Hunters in the Snow’. The bird flying above the water is a heron (herons are often seen on the river at Worcester) and there is a reference here to the the work of the late Graham Sutherland ‘Bird over Sand’. Sutherlands once highly regarded work is now less popular.
Therefore ‘Lost’ represents the real, physical loss of surroundings necessary for existence and the metaphysical loss of ambiance created by our sense of place. A loss that is caused by sustained ignorance over time, as with global warming.

07703 308061

Kirstie

Trobe

Title: Catch of the Day
Watercolour and iridescent paint
20x16 Inches

The decline of marine life is as a direct result of overfishing and environmental factors. Global warming will mean there will be a greater risk from flooding but fewer fish to live in those waters.

07931564634

Kurt

Hickson

Black Sun on The Horizon (2020)
Acrylic on canvas, reclaimed plywood, mirror plates, star security screws, LED strip light
68 x 122 x 5cm approx

The sun alters our mood and perception of the world. It gives us energy, warmth, and light. It also has the power to kill us. Black Sun on The Horizon plays with ancient notions of the sun as a symbol of existence and harmony; the sunrise as a renewal of life and rebirth. Whilst its absence in the sky after sunset or during a solar eclipse represents something dark and destructive; becoming a symbol of death and the end of the world. In a more scientific era, the power of the sun can be seen in full effect in relation to the breakdown of the ozone layer and climate change. Made in 2020, Black Sun on The Horizon points to this destructive power, utilising light and dark to create a sense of foreboding, a feeling of unease in unprecedented times. From increasing global temperatures and warmer, rising oceans to division, hostility and major world conflicts. From recession, rising fuel, food and energy costs to ongoing Covid-19 related issues; Black Sun on The Horizon represents a man-made apocalypse of sorts. Painted in matt black acrylic on canvas, the work is fixed in place by multiple mirror plates which replicate the corona of the sun, and is completed with a horizon line in the form of a yellow filtered strip light.

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LU

WENJUAN

Description:
This oil painting 28 November is about the sudden snowfall in England due to extreme weather on November 28, 2021. The scene of this painting is on the pedestrian bridge that the artist LU WENJUAN often passes by.
People usually think that snow is beautiful, but under this beauty are various problems caused by extreme weather, such as floods, etc., which will produce many chain reactions, which makes people very nervous and uneasy. Therefore, artist LUWENJUAN hopes to encourage people to reflect on how to deal with climate change and protect the environment starting from the current daily life.



Media: Oil on board
Dimensions: 35 x 28cm

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Lauren

Saunders

Collaboration with Water, 2022, Ink and mould on recycled paper. 30cm x 23cm.

I explore pressing existential questions surrounding the relationships between the human and non-human within my highly experimental drawing research-practice. Environmental philosophies and ethics, cutting-edge scientific research, Traditional Ecological Knowledge and my own direct, earth-rooted experiences inspire and influence my work.

I’m interested in how drawing can be used to positively affect physical and social change in relation to environmental ethics and the natural world, exploring ways in which drawn ‘line’ can directly support wildlife and challenge audiences to reflect on their own relationship to nature. In particular, my practice-research investigates how to best listen and respond to the ‘voice’ of more-than-human entities, with the aim of developing and promoting radical empathy, kindness and kinship towards the Earth. If we are to survive the unimaginable future post-climate-breakdown, we must (re)learn to value the non-human and listen.

In this particular piece - of which the 'voice' of water is centered, I submerged a contour drawing inside a darkened container of water for present non-human entities to have complete agency over, collaborate on and complete as an equal co-creator of knowledge over a course of 10 weeks.

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Lewis

Graham

30x40cm
Charcoal on Linen canvas

It depicts a vast landscape showing the burning of crops in the distance.

07961206049

Lois Karen

Meiklejohn

Remain is a framed, fine art photograph measuring 42cm wide x 59cm long. It speaks of environmental issues and associated destruction. Lois uses textiles to portray death and drowning of populations, as well as landscapes and the world's fragile ecosystems.

07801701835

Lorsen

Camps

I re-purpose and re-use objects in my work – things that are both discarded and disregarded. ‘Hot Point’ is a found object sculptural work and painting created with reclaimed polystyrene, acrylic and household paint.

The work directly raises the issue of climate change both visually and conceptually. The world is reaching a temperature and climate that is irreversible and calamitous – a ‘hot point’; a danger zone. The warm colours of the painting mirror this thermal increase and the red sky offers a warning. I have picked away at the surface of the polystyrene to add a textured element to the piece, fitting for a snowscape or mountainous iceberg. The piece is fragile - fitting for a work relating to environmental concerns.

My aim is to get people to look at things around them differently. In this work, I’ve taken packaging from a Hotpoint washing machine which inspired the title. The production of one-use materials such as (expanded) polystyrene continues to have a negative impact on the environment. Here I am taking a non-biodegradable material that is not readily recycled and re-using this utilitarian object as a canvas of sorts, to create an artwork out of something destined for landfill.

Dimensions: 70cm x 68cm x 11cm

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Louis

Palmer

Black and white photograph documenting the tradition of burning the heather from the grouse moors for grouse shooting The photograph questions the impact this traditional environmental practise has on the climate and environment as a whole as well. 20 inch’s by 15.5

07766 201677

Maria Cristina

Gardiner

'Natural Cause', oil on canvas, framed size 125x95cm.

‘Natural cause’ is one of a series of paintings based on the Severn Estuary, a place for which I feel a strong emotional tie because of its temporal connection to physicality.
The title is a wordplay on an ‘ending’, death by climate change, that is not ‘natural’ at all.
I have tried to depict an ‘erasure’ from the physical world: the dock in the foreground and riverbed are confusingly and partly deleted. The painting is a complete finished work (January 2022) carried out of with the traditional medium of oil painting.

Working assumptions  the estuary is a metaphor for changes in the physical environment, in a post-industrial man-made landscape. Its very existence is now dependent on climate change.

Reasons  The estuary is a powerful geographical phenomenon and a high energy environment that never stands still. Powerful tides, twice daily, move mudbanks dangerous to human but essential to sustain life with carbon capture and sustaining specific wildlife unique to estuaries. Mud is the amorphous material, shaped by the tides, that forms the body of the estuary, together with rock, dirt, insects, algae and dried plants. Estuaries get life from effluents and their relationship with the sea and are arguably one the most important ecosystem on the planet.

Estuaries contain intrinsic characteristics but by necessity they are now subject to substantial climate and environmental changes. Modifications in the sea-level are affecting the amount of seawater in the freshwater environment: important tidal freshwater zones in estuaries being squeezed out and lost as climate change causes saltwater from the sea to move further inland and river flows reduce.

Poisonous effluents due to industrial or agricultural processing are discharged in the estuary compounding the effect of climate change.

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Marie-Therese

King

Using the medium of cyanotype - I created one off images using the uv rays of the sun to expose carefully composed collages of found natural materials collected on the floodplains of the river teme. These are then developed using the flood water creating pieces which are all shades of blue.

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Marta

Pedzik

My painting is based off the Coventry canal. In the first week of my semester of University (in September) as part of an introduction workshop, the course was taken on a canal boat along the canal. We were given the task to make quick sketches of anything we saw along the way; I managed to get a simple drawing of the landscape, with the view of the canal and the foliage along the riverside. I made this painting on paper in response to that drawing, which had very minimal information; this meant that in realising the image and transferring it into a coherent visual image, I had to use my imagination and be inventive. I am submitting this painting for this topic as it presents the Coventry canal. However, the image is not realistic, as I have used my imagination to exaggerate colours and marks. Although in reality, the canal does look as nice as this, the intensive colour and imagery is meant to represent the feeling of nature and the canal. Bodies of water, such as canals, can be useful indicators of climate change; in the summer when the UK was in a draught, the canal water level lowered significantly. On the other hand, while we have had bad, rainy and windy weather, the water level has been dangerously high. Signs of climate change are around us constantly, we just have to look out for them (other than the obvious - its hot when it shouldn't be or its cold etc). Nature is telling us when things are wrong. My painting is a representation of nature, and the beauty of it, to signify its importance. Perhaps when something is shown in a beautiful light, more people notice it.

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Matt

Greenhill

Plant Trees! (2021) acrylic on FSC wood, 30x30cm. I made this painting in response to the planting of a mini forest on an allotment site close to my home. The project was made possible through the Woodland Trust's free trees for communities scheme. The Woodland Trust advises that native woods and trees are one of the best ways to tackle the climate crisis. They lock up carbon, reduce pollution and flooding and support people, wildlife and livestock in adapting to the climate crisis. However, more trees are needed. If the UK is to reach its carbon neutral target by 2050, the Committee on Climate Change has recommended an increase in woodland cover from 13% to 19%. Also creating native woodland ecosystems is vital for creating biodiversity. The UK's native woods and trees are incredibly biodiverse. They support many different species of fungi, lichens, mosses and plants, as well as birds, invertebrates and other animals. Many of these species are threatened and are becoming rarer.

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Maureen

Heaney-Sykes

A recent study by the Met Office has revealed that sea levels are rising much faster than a century ago and estimates show that there are 11 areas of the UK alone that could be underwater by 2050 and a large area of the Midlands by 2100. Human-caused land subsidence and rising sea levels due to global climate change mean that people living near the sea are vulnerable as coastal waters are rising at rates of up to 2mm per year.

Heavy rainfall over land has increased likely due to human influence which also leads to higher risks of river and surface water flooding particularly during winter on roads and low-lying land. Flood alerts are more common when river levels are rising and increased temperatures due to global warming means the atmosphere can hold more water, which is then released in rainfall and a drought may end with heavy rainfall that cannot drain away.

‘Flow Lines’ shows a specific pattern of movement between 1953-1984 in the region and highlights these themes with lines of different widths, marks and colours showing the variations in flow during this time.

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Melanie

Woodhead

Eco-anxiety and its psychological effects are increasing and having a disproportionate impact on young people. Framed within the discourse on the democracy of photography as a tool of agency (Sontag,1977) my PhD practice research explores transitional space and adolescence in times of climate crisis. The psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott defined transitional space as an intermediate area; a space of experiencing between inner and outer worlds where primary creativity exists. I am exploring this term in relation to teenagers' relationship with nature and the environment and how this impacts their sense of agency. This diptych is from a series of transaquatypes based on images of teenagers taken at Avon Meadows Community Wetland in Pershore, Worcestershire. The transaquatype process involves soaking inkjet prints in water causing the print to distort and the colours to bleed and behave unpredictably. The action of the water on the print reflects the transformative effects of flooding and teenagers' sense of environmental instability. Altered spaces emerge and create a fluidity that questions the gap between me and not me, to explore teenagers’ visions of their shared environmental future.

Dimensions: 40cm x 50cm framed

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Mell

Schofield

Size approximately 39cm x 28cm.

The worlds Glaciers are melting away at a rapid speed due to the rising temperatures and climate change. This is the Franz Josef Glacier in New Zealand, that i visited back in 2012. The white for the foreground represents the place in which it used to fill, and the stippling/dots represent what is left and still fading away every minute. The glacier is disappearing at at rate of 50 metres per year. The top section of the drawing made up of dots represents the section and size of it left today.

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Michelle

Slark

Heavy, continuous rainfall caused Bucknell village to be cut off, as roads flooded when the river burst it's banks. This was November 2022. In contrast, this summer, after several dry weeks and record breaking temperatures, the river completely dried up for a period of six weeks.
This monochrome digital image was captured on a bleak afternoon at 3pm, outside the village school.

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Michelle

Doidge

“Storm on the Horizon” by MICHELLE DOIDGE
Oil on canvas 40cmx30cm, framed 53cmx42cm

This dramatic painting represents the battle man has with the environment and how he must ultimately respect this and the natural world around him.
The tiny boat at the centre of the painting represents the insignificance of mankind compared with the vast and mighty environment as it battles against the approaching storm.
The painting is both representational as well as metaphorical as the storm of climate change is rapidly approaching and like the boat it seems we are powerless to stop it gaining the upper hand. It also represents how we must respect nature and not try to outsmart it.
Storms often mean flooding is likely and with ever more frequent storms occurring worldwide widespread flooding is a real and severe consequence of climate change.
Even though there will be turbulent times ahead for the boat the storm will eventually pass and hopefully the boat will survive and equilibrium will be restored.
I wanted to use a bold and dramatic yet, in parts , colourful painting to depict this struggle.

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Miles

Pilling

30cm x 30cm signed and dated mounted and framed digital photograph, printed on archival quality paper.

I spent my career working in television news and covered many of the River Severn floods as a cameraman working on live outside broadcasts. The river bursting its banks at Worcester is always a spectacle - whether through the media circus of television news or simply via individual mobile phones. There is a voyeuristic appeal about the floods that will draw people to come and look and to take pictures. The private impact on people personally affected can sometimes be forgotten in that public "wow, look at that" moment.

The environmental crisis affects our personal and public lives without discrimination though. This photograph is part of a project I began pre-Covid exploring the paradoxes that exist between what we consider to be public and private and how mobile devices can bring what we consider to be our private lives into the public domain.

For example, does the photo of Worcester Cathedral and the Severn in flood in the screen of the anonymous mobile phone photographer when I press the shutter of my camera "belong" to him, to myself or in fact to anybody? - It is after all just light reflected.

Ultimately the environment pays no heed to what we humans consider public, private or personal. We need to understand this deeply within ourselves and not just conceptually if we are to avoid the personal human misery of catastrophic climate change.

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Monica

Perez Vega

The Haunt, 2022, acrylic, spray paint, flashe and oil on canvas, 160x200cm.

I started this painting during lockdown, a time of isolation and fear. It is about concern for my family, separated by sea and concern for the land, swallowed by sea. It is also about the ways in which life quietly exists in between places, and of the hope that can be found amid disruption.

My imagined landscapes sit between nostalgia and unease. Originally from California, I have lived in Montreal, Amsterdam, London and Birmingham, UK. My memories of home are warped by a changing landscape, and my experiences of continually starting over have led to a practice which investigates cycles of change.

I am interested in the potential between renewal or collapse as I explore themes of uncertainty and adaptation. My interest in skies is about both transience and presence, as well as a wider concern for the environment. Trees, on the other hand are anthropomorphic figures which tell a story of steady resilience.

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Nerissa

Cargill Thompson

My work explores climate crisis and the permanence of disposables through sculptures combining embellished textiles and concrete cast in waste plastic packaging; giving a distinct contrast between the manmade structure of the packaging and the soft natural textures of the textiles. I create my signature textiles by blending a variety of recycled fabrics using an embellisher to create subtle variations in tone that mimic moss and lichen. No Man is an Island refers to our collective responsibility for the environment; our actions have a global effect. Sinking Series depicts three real islands that are disappearing due to the rise in sea levels; inspired by maps and aerial photographs.

Wall hung mixed media triptych.
Each piece 23 x 23 x 2 cm Framed.
Embellished recycled fabrics (mainly old clothes) and concrete.

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Nick

St George

Apart from a brief clip of speech at the beginning and the public domain recording of Chopin's Raindrop Prelude (from archive.org), the entire piece comprises field recordings of the Rivers Severn and Teme (made at Diglis, Upton & Powick), plus heavy rain (Malvern). The piano represents normal or everyday life, "civilisation" if you will, which is gradually overwhelmed by the rising waters. But perhaps there is a glimmer of hope at the end, if only the environmental mettle can be grasped...
The piece is also a celebration of the possibilities of sound - if visual art makes us SEE the world differently, audio art can enable us to HEAR the world differently. As a sculptor takes a piece of clay and transforms it into something often unrecognisable from its origins, the technology available to the sound artist enables the transformation of (in this case) familiar field recordings into an array of new and unique audio experiences: some strange, some lyrical, some disturbing...
The title refers to Sabrina, nymph (or goddess) of the Severn and is taken from John Milton's 'Comus'. It is used here ironically!
Should you select this work, I would like to propose one of three options for exhibiting it: a) in its own room via a good set of stereo speakers, b) in the gallery via headphones or c) in the gallery via speakers as a soundscape accompaniment to the other exhibits. The piece has been sent to you via Dropbox and We Transfer. The image below is just to ensure this form is accepted.

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Nigel

Goldsmith

In this film discarded plastic recovered from a small beach in north Pembrokeshire is filmed underwater to present a dystopian vision of a flooded and polluted world. The film’s audio is a blend of recordings captured above and below the water’s surface combined with the sounds made by using the discarded plastic to make crude instruments.

The film can be viewed here https://vimeo.com/480316096/c25579522a

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Nigel

Goldsmith

In this film discarded plastic recovered from a small beach in north Pembrokeshire is filmed underwater to present a dystopian vision of a flooded and polluted world. The film’s audio is a blend of recordings captured above and below the water’s surface combined with the sounds made by using the discarded plastic to make crude instruments.

The film can be viewed and downloaded from this link https://vimeo.com/480316096/c25579522a

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Patricia

Baylis

My submission is a painting which takes its inspiration from photographs I took while on a cruise to the Arctic. It had been a long held ambition of mine to visit that part of the world. I was fortunate, while moored at Pyramiden in Svalbard, to sail up close to a glacier and see for myself the ice gradually melting in to the sea forming ice floes. I now wonder how much of this majestic force of nature remains as our planet warms.

The painting has been made using acrylic paint.

Unframed 46cm by 56 cm
Framed approximately 52cm by 62 cm

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Paul

Newman

Birmingham Wholesale Wastelands, 75 x 100 cm, acrylic on canvas, 2022

The heat of last summer was absurd. In following the cooling of autumn, a glass panel of our conservatory roof shattered; the home studio where this painting was completed. Birmingham Wholesale Wastelands depicts the demolition site of what used to be the 900-year-old Birmingham market site before being bulldozed for redevelopment. The skip, the statue and the spaniel (from a Stubbs painting) have been added to imply a story and atmosphere inspired by the dry heat and melancholia of a De Chirico painting.
We live in volatile times with the environment and our impact on it, human conflict and the merciless progress of knock down and rebuild in Birmingham and many other cities like it. It seems there’s no time left for pause and reflect.

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Paul

Powis

Floods in Worcester provide regular inspiration as they happen so often. The fact that we have two rivers, the Severn and the Teme, whose source is in Wales, means that water levels can rise dramatically and cover vast amounts of land on the flood plain. This image of the confluence was one of a series where I used a monoprinting technique, covering the surface of the paper with a pigment before wiping away the light areas with a cloth. I like the fact that the edges are left raw, showing the drips and smudges of the painting process. This series of images appears on the Bridgeman Art Library and one of them was recently used by an American publisher for the book on the Biblical Flood, “The Lost World of the Flood”, by Longman and Walton.

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Paul

Powis

Floods in Worcester provide regular inspiration as they happen so often. The fact that we have two rivers, the Severn and the Teme, whose source is in Wales, means that water levels can rise dramatically and cover vast amounts of land on the flood plain. This image of the confluence was one of a series where I used a monoprinting technique, covering the surface of the paper with a pigment before wiping away the light areas with a cloth. I like the fact that the edges are left raw, showing the drips and smudges of the painting process. This series of images appears on the Bridgeman Art Library and one of them was recently used by an American publisher for the book on the Biblical Flood, “The Lost World of the Flood”, by Longman and Walton.

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Phil

Hopkinson

The Severn in flood depicts the ominous threat of climate change locally through the rise and flooding of the river Severn.
The moody Malvern hills depict an ominous future yet the sky gives us hope.

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Rebecca

Tanner

In the Bible, the white dove carrying an olive branch was a sign that the great flood was over, and that Noah could return to land. The dove has become a symbol of peace and hope. My hand embroidered thread painting, “Dove of the New World”, is a symbol of the changes we are causing our planet and the adaptation necessary for survival.

There’s something admirable about the feral pigeon. Its ancestors were rock doves, living in flocks on perilous, rugged cliffs. Hundreds of years of selective breeding by people created the domestic pigeon; birds which became so invaluable for their ability to carry messages, they have more war medals than any other animal. Modern day pigeons are highly adaptable, they persist in a landscape constantly under change, the concrete and bricks of cities replacing their clifftop homelands.

Human activities affect the natural world in every corner of the planet. Our reliance on fossil fuels changes the composition of gases in the atmosphere, destabilising the climate and making natural disasters like floods more common. The loss of biodiversity we are fuelling is so stark, scientists are labelling it the 6th mass extinction on earth.

Without real action to halt climate change, the future of life on earth looks bleak. Evolution is too slow for current rate of change to the ecosystem. The only species that will survive are those which can adapt to the new world we are creating. Perhaps the adaptable feral pigeon will be able to out-last the floods while so many other species perish. The natural world once so rich, diverse, and vibrant, a long distant memory.

Maybe we, like the pigeon, will be able to change. We can reduce our use of fossil fuels, slow climate change and protect our environment. However, if we continue down the current path, we will create a planet which few species can inhabit. Our choices over the next few years will decide the future of the planet and humanity.

Dimensions: 6-inch diameter

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Rebecca

George

This busy abstract image of raindrops depicts the increasing frequency and intensity of flooding that we're experiencing globally.

Dimensions are 10x8inch

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Richard

Nicholls

My work with elements from the natural world mean that I have an interest in the effects that the climate emergency will have on nature and the role that it can play in reducing the impact of the rise in global temperature.

It's well known that trees play an important role in the action against climate change. Willows are often found along river banks and these are being planted in increasing numbers to provide a natural defence to lessen the effects of flooding and reduce soil erosion. Planting Willow, alongside other species, has been found to help stabilise the soil and slow the speed of floodwater across the floodplain. The long lifespan of trees means that this is a positive step being planned for and happening right now in projects across the UK.

I have chosen Polaroid images of trees for this exhibition. I like the aesthetic of Polaroid instant film – slightly soft with colours that don't always remain the same as when first taken, they can shift and processing defects can continue to spread throughout the image.

180 Willows – Polaroid instant film, 27x11cm, mounted and framed to 44x32cm

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Richard

Gilbert

This work is a tempera painting on panel, measuring 52 cm x 60 cm, painted in 2022. It depicts a flooded river where I live, on a winter morning
Artist's Statement
The river lifts the spirit and provides space to think and breathe. The river provides the sustenance and support without complaint or recognition. The river flows through the history of humankind and tell us what is necessary for life. The river is not just somewhere to walk but something to be respected and should be allowed to follow its own nature. If it fails, we will be sick, and will fail. I have seen the river in all its seasons, in flood and drought. I’ve seen swans, geese and herons, kingfishers and dragonflies, salmon and brown trout beneath its surface. Yet over the past few years this precious ecology is threatened by industry and agriculture and the fate of the river is as uncertain as our future. The river is a barometer of climate change.

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SOEUN

KIM

"Climate change" was a keyword that made news headlines in a number of countries in the summer of 2022. Western Europe, Central Asia, East Asia, and the United States have been knocked down due to heat waves and floods. Furthermore, every continent on this planet has been economically damaged, and there have been a lot of casualties. So, this work dealt with recently the most emerged social issues and incorporated the usual beliefs of an individual. In particular, it was inspired by "climate change" and produced to alert people to severe problems caused by the polluted earth. The artwork consisted of reused and eco-friendly materials like branches falling in the park, moss, beeswax, and tangled wires that are not harmful to the environment to prevent the contradictory behavior of producing non-recyclable mixed waste and air pollution by doing "Art Activities." In addition, it is intended to show humanity trying to suppress and take control of organic nature by imitating the shape of the human body. It was expressed as nature personified and used an intuitive way of expressing it to show tragedy, such as the earth that heats up and melts because of greenhouse gas emissions and a pool of water.

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Sara

Hayward.

The warm palette used in this image is as much a nod to the physical aspects of climate change as to the passion of those who care about it. The concept of “Red sky at night, shepherd’s delight, Red sky in the morning, shepherd’s warning”, first appears in the Bible in the book of Matthew. It is an old weather saying often used at sunrise and sunset to signify the changing sky, and was originally known to help the shepherds prepare for the next day’s weather. Here the restricted palette and big brush strokes combine to convey the River Severn in full flood with South Quay on the Severn Way submerged.

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Sara-Louise

Dobson

Do Not Go Gentle is acrylic and gold leaf on canvas 75 X 55cm

It is part of a body of work which explores divisions within society; from ideologies to calls for action. The gold leaf is used to represent the 'preferred societal axis', whereby intentions and subsequent actions do not align. The work was inspired by Dylan Thomas' Do Not Go Gentle and Mynerva Reynolds, Little Boxes. Many industries and areas of society, on both a macro and micro level, have differing and often controversial perceptions of climate change; its impact and actions needed collectively. Do Not Go Gentle seeks represent the profound impact on our world, in a non-representational format, that can be widely interpreted to reflect the widening gap between climate impact and action.

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Sarah

Jones

This marker post is made from reclaimed wooden posts sliced into sections and mounted on a central steel support. Height 8ft or 2.5 mts, the widest point being the metal base at 30 cm sq.
I use posts as markers symbolising ideas ........This is the second post I'd created in response to climate change, the first (exhibited at the RA summer Show 2022) brought attention to global warming utilising the climate warming stripes of climate scientist Ed Hawkins MBE. This current piece highlights the colours used to mark deep and dangerous waters, the different stripe combinations are a nod to flood measures and warnings. A stark reminder of the rising water levels.

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Sharon

Baker

'Large Water I'. Photopolymer Intaglio Print, edition of 5. Image size 20.5 x 21.5 cm, frame size 35 x 36 cm. This print is based on a manhole cover/boundary box giving access to water. It is one of thousands found on our streets bringing to eye level the discreet, hidden-in-plain-sight designs that we walk on everyday. It is an image of an access point to the subterranean networks and infrastructure that makes our towns and cities work. It is an example of humans supposed control over the flow of water, a symbol of containment, management, order and structure in our society, though we know full well this is an illusion. It is a marker of humankind's attempt to control our natural resources for our benefit.
Unframed prints are also available in this edition.

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Shaun

Hughes

The picture is an Ariel vie of a flooded Worcester. Above, there are strong weather systems streaming across the city. The painting depicts the power of nature. The painting is acrylic on canvas 50 x 60 x 2 cm

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Shaun

Hughes

The painting presents an arial view of a flooded Worcester. Above, weather systems stream across the city.
The painting depicts the power of nature.

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Shaun

Morris

The painting, ‘The Turn of the Tide’, depicts a former WWII lookout bunker that has, due to coastal erosion, slid slowly down from its position on the low cliffs of the East Yorkshire coast onto the beach. I’ve been drawing these ruins and emblems of recent history, which are dotted along the beaches in this region for miles, the concrete and metal fragments of their expressive forms protruding from the sand and sea, for years on annual visits to this stretch of landscape.

The bunker depicted in this painting, in its slow descent from the cliff face, finds itself twisted around from its original position of looking out for enemy invaders to now be facing blindly away from the incoming tide. Although based on observation, the painting could be seen as making a prescient comment on the climate crisis as the bunker, designed to protect, looks mutely away, like so many of our leaders, Canute-like at the rising sea levels approaching ever faster to bury it forever.

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Simone

Detre

Dimensions framed under glass 72 cm x 96 cm
'Circus of Life'
The painting/collage depicts climate change events such as icebergs melting, sea levels rising, more intense weather events leading to floods and drought, forest fires, example: destruction of people's homes, apes and biodiversity. Ecosystem is disturbed with animals such as Hawksbill turtle, Sundra tiger, Amier leopard, Jaran rhino, Cross River gorilla, Sumatran elephant and butterflies on the verge of extinction. The people are looking on in the 'Circus of Life', juggling their lives with work and family. Is it the eleventh hour? The unicyclist is young and full of hope symbolising a positive future with solutions such as wind turbines to help reverse the negative trend.

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Sophy

King

I wasn't sure what category to put this in, the submitted work is a print on aluminium, of a photograph. The photograph is of a sculpture/object, and the object is part of an ongoing intervention/land art project by myself
Witness, 2022, sublimation print onto aluminium, 120cm x 80cm
Drought Stone I, 2022, sandstone carving at Rudyard Lake, Staffordshire
First of a series of stone carvings bearing witness to drought and flood levels as extreme weather becomes normalised.
A hunger stone is a type of hydrological landmark common in Central Europe. Hunger stones serve as famine memorials and warnings and were erected in Germany and in ethnic German settlements throughout Europe in the 15th through 19th centuries.
These stones were embedded into a river during droughts to mark the water level as a warning to future generations that they will have to endure famine-related hardships if the water sinks to this level again. In 2022 we saw rivers and lakes water levels fall to extremes. This carving is the beginning of a project to bring a new set of warning stones marking water levels, high and low. It poses a question about what next year will bring. Should it re-emerge I will return for a ceremonial re-opening for the work.

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Sue

Cohen

There is many references in our history that climate change had been researched as a cause of the difference in the earth’s climate. As far back as 1383. However on the night of the 31st of January 1953 a tidal surge come down the North Sea flooding low lying lands in its path. Canvey Island was badly hit ,its old earth sea wall was inefficient and practically destroyed Fifty nine people died and 13,000 were evacuated from their homes. The cause of the flood was a storm surge likely to be caused by climate change which increases the size of the sea levels and again increases as it reaches land. With this in mind I have been investigating my own link with Canvey Island through my exploration into the coexistence of my family, its migration, resettlement and assimilation. Marten refers to the bungalow my father’s family lived in during WW2. They had escaped the bombing of London East End and through various methods bought a property on the Thames Estuary. Essex had been a natural migration from the East End for many people. Marten housed the whole family and their offspring until after 1949 when the family separated into their small nuclear units and settled across London and Essex. However the bungalow in Canvey Island still held strong links with the family. They were to learn of the night of the flood through the news and friends kept them informed of any causalities of friends and neighbours. It was with great sadness they were informed that Marten their previous happy home had been swept away in the Great Flood.
‘Marten’ painted on unstretched canvas and to be hung like a 1950s wall hang1950s wall hanging threaded through a pole at the top and hung on string, is a reference to the family bungalow during the Great Flood of 1953. The four people escaping the flood are members of my family, although not physically involved in the events of that night, it had great emotional repercussions. The bungalow has been taken from the only surviving photo of the property.

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Sue

Challis

Things Are Going Wrong 2022 (acryllic, print, pen, collage, on primed cotton) 60cmsx64cms
Collage based on year-long project making work in and about raised peat bogs and mosses in the West Midlands, mainly Fenn, Bettisfield and Whixhall. Peat bogs are globally significant environments which conserve water and prevent flooding through sphagnum moss (depicted in the work) and carbon dioxide, having as much or greater positive impact per area as rainforests. They are also a rich landscape for wildlife and rare plants, and contain much of our own history as the acidic bog water preserves tools, artifacts and even bodies in their layered folds. The work reflects a despair about human destructivness ('...and I can't make it better') but also celebrates the ancient life of bogs which, with support, have endured and continue to endure and could offer us redemption.

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Susan

Birth

An imagined landscape with dwellings near water created using acrylic paint and inks on paper. Lull (before the storm). Around 35 x 35 cm. Framed.

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Sylvia

Wadsley

Waters Rising is an oil on canvas painting (52cm x 52cm) from my series 'Thaw' which explores the sad beauty of ice melt and its impact on the landscape. I try to capture our innate connection with nature whilst acknowledging disconnection through advancing urbanisation and climate change. The view that we are interconnected and interdependent with nature is central to my work. I distil these feelings of connection and disconnection representing landscape as both poetic and beautiful and also exploited and endangered.
I leave it to the viewer to see the landscape and perhaps beyond.

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